Lords coalition set to fight for amendments Brexit bill

The group of peers across parties in the UK will seek modifications to cross bench, in spite of critics contending that the attempts would initiate reforms to the upper chamber of the UK Parliament.

Peers cutting across party lines will attempt to modify the Brexit proposals of Theresa May in the House of Lords of the UK. Many Tory members of Parliament reacted to this by saying that these attempts would either trigger for reform or elimination of the upper chamber of the British Parliament.

A coalition of the Liberal democrats, Labour, Conservative and some cross bench peers are aiming to combine together to pressurize the government to amend the Brexit Bill. This bill authorizes Theresa May to initiate article 50.

The debate to amend the Brexit bill commence in the House of Lords and as many as 200 peers are keen to debate on this issue in the upper chamber of the UK parliament where the government does not have an majority. The debate will make it clear to what extent the peers intend to propose to the amendments to the Brexit bill, on which they will be voting next week, as quoted by The Guardian.

The diverse amendments that are being proposed by the peers include assurance on the rights of the EU nationals residing in the UK and securing a more consequential parliament vote at the end of two years, which a majority is likely to be materialized.

On the other hand, some of the peers are likely to seek significant modifications. For instance, a former Labour cabinet minister, Peter Hain has sought for retaining the UK as a member of the single market and complete opening of the borders with Ireland.

Peter Hain has said that though critics will question his rights to oppose or seek amendments to this bill as an unelected peer, he argues that he is a representative to the parliament appointed by the party. In the referendum held for Brexit, more than two-thirds of the voters supporting the Labor party had voted to remain. The former cabinet minister from the Labor party added that it was this voice of the people, the electors’ mandate that he was representing in the upper chamber.

Similar amendments to the Brexit bill are also being sought by the Liberal Democrats along with continuing the membership of the nuclear body Euratom, and one more referendum to vote on the terms of the deal with the EU that have been proposed by Theresa May.

A chief member of the New Labour, Peter Mandelson has appealed to the peers of the upper chamber to not be in haste over the issue of opposing the government on the Brexit issue. He asked the pro-European union politicians to be braver in their support of the modifications to the Brexit bill and appealed to the people to contribute to the petition by Tony Blair to oppose against leaving the European Union.